On orbasciousness

Some things just make me happy. (Really. Honestly. I can be happy. Stop sniggering!) 

When I make up a new word, it gives me a tiny thrill… but it has to be a real, possible, actual new word. Not something that someone else has ever used before. I have to have brought it from a crevice in my grey matter through all the myriad pathways and out, into the light,for all the world to see.

Ta Dah!

Ta Dah!

During my last post, a couple of days ago, I did just that. (Ta Dah!)

It was a bit of a surprise to me, but there it suddenly was. Out it popped. I had thought ‘orbsession‘ might be a new word, which I think it was, lexically speaking, but it’s probable that I had come across it in the various discussions that had taken place in the Open Group for Bedlam Farm’s groups, so I cannot clay claim to inventing that one. Several members had become fascinated by ‘orbing’ their photographs and lots of nonsense had ensued, primarily dredging the depths of pun-related humour. A ‘punathon’ if you will.

But, no. That wasn’t the word that gave me the happiness. It was that much better, more satisfyingly jubilant word, ‘ronduration‘. I meant it to describe the process of making something rounder, orb-like, giving something that had hitherto existed in only a one dimensional plane a new perspective. Rounding it off. A bit like the mathematical process of rounding numbers off – although in that sense, I suppose, the purpose is to give them a more tailored, shortened and visually acceptable appearance so that all people can interpret them more easily. If I ever go back to teaching that concept to young children, I may indeed utilize a form of my new word.

But for now, ronduration is a word I want to use to describe how my perspective changes when I apply a simple process to the visual representation of a momentary snap in time – for that is what a photograph actually is. When I take a photograph of something, I am consciously attempting to capture an exact moment in time when, if I’ve got everything just right, just so, the image that is captured is perfect. The lighting is exactly right for the story I’m telling, visually. The composition is expertly, dexterously crafted to appear entirely co-incidental, yet I know (and others, who have similar skills will recognise) that significant thought has been poured into creating the precise harmony of this perfect image. The subject matter itself is of some inherently interesting corporeality that I imagine, in some way, others may also want to experience.

Kodak Instamatic 25 - my first camera

Kodak Instamatic 25 – my first camera

So, I’ve been taking these photographs for donkey’s years now. Truly, it has been a long time. I think I first used a camera, a Kodak Instamatic 25, when I was about 6 years old in 1967… now there was a camera! All I could do was put my tiny baby blue eyes up to the minute viewfinder and ‘click’. I was hooked though and have taken thousands of photos, many with more complex apparatus since then. A jillion of these have been indescribably, even deplorably unsightly. Some of them have been nearly perfect.

Or so I thought.

But the ronduration of some of my favoured old images has given me pause for thought. I’m looking at them all now with new ocular ‘vision’. Things that I remember about the original image – the time of day, the event itself, the aromas of association – all of these are called into question as I consider how best to ‘rondurate’. I feel like I am making a new version of the memory. It is so exhilarating!

That instamatic makes an interesting orb...

That instamatic makes an interesting orb…

Some images refuse to accept ronduration.I’ve tried several different versions, but they just don’t work. These images, clearly, are ones which must remain intact. Not necessarily because they are already perfect. More likely there is some serendipity about them that I have yet to perceive. There’s time yet.

Orbasciousness is another new word, although not one I can claim to be wholly responsible for… that would be my virtual friend, Susan Popper, who invented the root word – orbascious – which I think describes the state the images wind up as once they have been through ronduration. So, thank you Susan, for your contribution to the development of my own personal lexicon!

I’ll leave you with just a few more rondurations… and the promise that these will be available soon should you wish to look at them more often and purchase them for your own walls.

Thanks for reading!

Rockpools

Rockpools

Christmas tree

Christmas tree

Daisy

Daisy

Gannet in flight

Gannet in flight

Gormley's Angel of the North

Gormley’s Angel of the North

Gorse flowers on clifftop

Gorse flowers on clifftop

Harbour ropes

Harbour ropes

Poppy in a field of rape

Poppy in a field of rape

Songbird

Songbird

Pink sweetpea

Pink sweetpea

Purple sweetpea

Purple sweetpea

Sweetpeas - a riot of summer madness!

Sweetpeas – a riot of summer madness!

Sydney Opera House

Sydney Opera House

Wild Poppy

Wild Poppy

 

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Posted on January 15, 2014, in Achievements, Artwork, Blogging, Digital artwork, Dreams, Marketing artwork, Personal, photography, writing and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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