I remember.

Fallen Heroes - the poppies tumble out of the Tower of London

Fallen Heroes – the poppies tumble out of the Tower of London

After all of the beautiful images of the services at the Tower of London yesterday, I wanted to repost these pictures I took in early September of the poppies, which at that point hadn’t filled all the space in the Tower’s now defunct moat.

My grandfather fought for twenty-seven years in the Royal Horse Artillery as a gunner – he had to be able to transport the lighter cannon guns around battlefields, presumably on horseback as I understand it – until he lost a leg during the bloody carnage at Passchendaele, known as the third Battle of Ypres, in October 1917. I’m told that he demanded his men help him search for his severed lower limb in the mud before being dragged out and transported to the field hospital that day. He was lucky. There was a significant amount of mustard gas used during that battle and on top of all of that, there had been weeks of very heavy, unexpected rainfall creating an enormous quagmire in the field of battle. Many soldiers who had been badly wounded lay where they had fallen, firmly ensconced in the thick, gelatinous mud, unable to crawl to safety alone and impossible for others to rescue without being stranded themselves.

For King and Country - the Rose wades into the bloody conflict

For King and Country – the Rose wades into the bloody conflict

I am still researching to find out how my granddad, Thomas Sharp, managed to survive, against such absurdly improbable odds, but I am enormously grateful that he did, for I would not be here if he hadn’t. My mother was born in December 1920 – two years after the end of the Great War – so clearly without that moment of survival, she would not have been born and consequently neither would I. I am ever thankful and will always continue to remember him and the many hundreds of thousands of others who were not so fortunate in a century marked by constant conflicts around the globe.

‘They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them. ‘

These magnificent words from the poem written in 1914 by Robert Laurence Binyon echo down through the century and will continue to ring out our call to remember not only our own loved ones, but the great sacrifices that so many made, in defence of that which we hold so dear – the concept of freedom.

We WILL remember them.

Ceramic Poppies by ceramic artist, Paul Cummins

Ceramic Poppies by ceramic artist, Paul Cummins

 

Montage of the poppies surrounding the Tower

Montage of the poppies surrounding the Tower

 

 

 

 

As always, thanks for reading once more!

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Posted on November 12, 2014, in Ancient monuments, Art, Art installation, Artwork, British history, Floral, London, Mother, Personal, photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Like…very much! The rose with the blurred poppies background is super!

    Liked by 1 person

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